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dc.contributor.authorO'Síoráin, Carol-Ann
dc.contributor.authorTwomey, Miriam
dc.contributor.authorMc Guckin, Conor
dc.date.accessioned2022-07-26T15:10:16Z
dc.date.available2022-07-26T15:10:16Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13012/118
dc.descriptionThis article is written to draw the reader into reflecting on their own practice and to challenge the possible generalizability approach to autism. Having a definition or a diagnosis of autism does not mean we understand it but rather we must seek to understand the person.en_US
dc.description.abstractOur approach to working with children with autism in this article is not about the engagement philosophies but rather is focussed at a social communicative level: not just hearing and seeing but listening and understanding, therefore, communicating respect and dignity to the child. This article provides case examples from a qualitative research project on the literacy practices of children with autism. The role of the qualitative researcher in this project is to seek to advance knowledge to assist practice and policy. This article sets out to engage you, the reader, in considering how you connect and communicate with autistic children in your practice. It is about communication and what communication might look like if we open our understanding to all possibilities. It is also about the balance of agency in the learning environment for children with autism
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://reachjournal.ie/index.php/reach/issue/view/42/3en_US
dc.subjectAutism, Communication intent, teaching and learningen_US
dc.titleCreating Communicative Opportunities for Autistic Childrenen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.source.journaltitleREACH Journal of Inclusive Educationen_US
dc.source.volume34en_US
dc.source.issue1en_US
dc.source.beginpage29en_US
dc.source.endpage40en_US
html.description.abstractOur approach to working with children with autism in this article is not about the engagement philosophies but rather is focussed at a social communicative level: not just hearing and seeing but listening and understanding, therefore, communicating respect and dignity to the child. This article provides case examples from a qualitative research project on the literacy practices of children with autism. The role of the qualitative researcher in this project is to seek to advance knowledge to assist practice and policy. This article sets out to engage you, the reader, in considering how you connect and communicate with autistic children in your practice. It is about communication and what communication might look like if we open our understanding to all possibilities. It is also about the balance of agency in the learning environment for children with autismen_US
dc.contributor.corporateHibernia Collegeen_US
dc.contributor.corporateTrinity Collegeen_US
dc.contributor.corporateTrinity Collegeen_US


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