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dc.contributor.authorO'Síoráin, Carol-Ann
dc.contributor.authorShevlin, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2022-07-26T15:15:08Z
dc.date.available2022-07-26T15:15:08Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13012/122
dc.description.abstractIn March 2018, Ireland ratified the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UN CRPD). A fundamental aspect of this Convention is to develop a respectful, inclusive education for people with disabilities among their non-disabled peers. Ireland, while late to the notion of inclusive education, is working towards and with the EPSEN Act, and has legislated for a concept of inclusion in education (Government of Ireland, 2004). The question of who needs ‘special’ education in an ‘inclusive’ setting has come to the fore, highlighted by the education needs of children with autism. This article presents evidence of placement and educational experiences of children with autism that requires us to consider how inclusion is constructed and structured in our mainstream primary schools. It provides evidence of the stark reality that inclusion in practice reflects a ‘containment’ approach. Further, we are maintaining a concept that being a ‘different’ learner requires a ‘special’ approach and environment. This article argues that ethical sinkholes are created when there is little introspection on the ideology and practice of inclusion.
dc.relation.urlhttps://irelandseducationyearbook.ie/downloads/EMYB-20192020-3.pdfen_US
dc.subjectInclusion, Autism, social learning needsen_US
dc.titleInclusion or Containment? A reality for learners with autism in mainstream primary schoolsen_US
dc.typeBook chapteren_US
dc.source.booktitleEducation Matters: Ireland's Year Book on Educationen_US
dc.source.beginpage68en_US
dc.source.endpage77en_US
html.description.abstractIn March 2018, Ireland ratified the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UN CRPD). A fundamental aspect of this Convention is to develop a respectful, inclusive education for people with disabilities among their non-disabled peers. Ireland, while late to the notion of inclusive education, is working towards and with the EPSEN Act, and has legislated for a concept of inclusion in education (Government of Ireland, 2004). The question of who needs ‘special’ education in an ‘inclusive’ setting has come to the fore, highlighted by the education needs of children with autism. This article presents evidence of placement and educational experiences of children with autism that requires us to consider how inclusion is constructed and structured in our mainstream primary schools. It provides evidence of the stark reality that inclusion in practice reflects a ‘containment’ approach. Further, we are maintaining a concept that being a ‘different’ learner requires a ‘special’ approach and environment. This article argues that ethical sinkholes are created when there is little introspection on the ideology and practice of inclusion.en_US
dc.contributor.corporateHibernia Collegeen_US
dc.contributor.corporateTrinity Collegeen_US


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